St. Peter Faber, SJ: Patron Saint of Business?

St. Peter Faber, S.J.

St. Peter Faber, S.J.

Chris Lowney had an interesting article in National Catholic Register proposing that Peter Faber, S.J. be the patron saint for business people:

On Dec. 17, Pope Francis signed the bull of canonization recognizing Faber as a saint, and the relatively low-key elevation — no ornate Mass in St. Peter’s Square for poor Faber — is in keeping with his relative obscurity in the Jesuit pantheon. Faber was among the handful who co-founded the Jesuit order in the mid-1500s, but he never quite attained the renown of St. Ignatius of Loyola and St. Francis Xavier. No Jesuit church is complete without some triumphalistic mural or statuary of Loyola or Xavier. But Faber? He is usually one of an indistinguishable line of black-robed Jesuit extras, looking plastically pious at stage left of the mural.

His ministry was vital but not headline-grabbing. He was an extraordinarily capable spiritual director who reinvigorated clergy and bishops who had grown decadent, and patiently drew wavering Catholics back to the fold at a time when the Protestant Reformation was sweeping Europe. In an interview with La Civiltà Cattolica, Francis praised Faber’s style, his “dialogue with all … even with his opponents … his simple piety … his careful interior discernment … capable of being so gentle and loving.” Faber’s patient but ever-persistent outreach, his “frontier spirit” so to speak, embodies the culture change Francis is trying to engender in our church at large.

Read Full Article

Additional Resources on St. Peter Faber, S.J.:

Peter Faber, the first Jesuit Priest
Pope Francis and Peter Faber
Peter Faber to be declared Saint
The Spirituality of Peter Faber

About William Ockham

I am a father of two with eclectic interests in theology, philosophy and sports. I chose the pseudonym William Ockham in honor of his contributions to philosophy, specifically Occam's Razor, and its contributions to modern scientific theory. My blog (www.teilhard.com) explores Ignatian Spirituality and the intersection of faith, science and reason through the life and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (pictured above).
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2 Responses to St. Peter Faber, SJ: Patron Saint of Business?

  1. claire46 says:

    It is not really surprising that Chris Lowney would choose Peter Faber as the patron saint of business. Chris Lowney’s life seems to have been marked by his experience at J.P. Morgan as much as by his time in the Society of Jesus. Indeed, business folks praying Peter Faber might help them become better persons and better businesspeople.
    This suggestion, strangely enough, makes me feel forlorn. I very much like Peter Faber, because so much of what he was I am not and wish I were — and I doubt I will ever be a businesswoman.
    Peter Faber is a great companion for those who want to bring peace and understanding to polarized situations; for those who want to take the time to listen ever more gently to others’ sufferings; who want to let Godde speak through them to reach others and let those know what Godde wants them to know….
    But I am sure Peter Faber, from where he is, can be of help to any of us needing his help 🙂

    • “Peter Faber is a great companion for those who want to bring peace and understanding to polarized situations; for those who want to take the time to listen ever more gently to others’ sufferings; who want to let Godde speak through them to reach others and let those know what Godde wants them to know….
      But I am sure Peter Faber, from where he is, can be of help to any of us needing his help :-)”

      I believe you summed it up well. I believe you are correct that Chris Lowney was very much shaped by Morgan Stanley; he spent more years there than as a Jesuit. However, what impresses me about him is that he was able to rise to the levels he did at Morgan Stanley while still hanging on to Jesuit values. To get to Chris Lowney’s level at Morgan Stanely required a tremendous amount of talent, hard work and luck. I have seen way too often that people make significant compromises to achieve that level, often to their detriment and the detriment of others. I admire Chris Lowney because he appeared to have traversed that journey mostly successfully.

      In my own case, I certainly have not achieved Chris Lowney’s success in business nor have I always been true to God or myself.

      Peace,
      W. Ockham

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