Sunday Reflection, 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time (October 26, 2014): Responding to God’s Love

homelessPhoto Courtesy of www.madison.com 
“Love, and do what you like” — statement attributed to St. Augustine.

This Sunday is the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time. The readings can be found here. The Gospel reading is the Great Commandment, which consists of two parts: loving God and loving neighbor.  As the Gospel clearly indicates, these two parts are inseparable. One cannot love God without loving a neighbor and loving a neighbor without love of God risks devolving into another form of ego gratification: if we give a token amount of money to the homeless, our friends will think better of us or we will alleviate some of our guilt.

This week’s reflection comes from Pope Benedict’s XVI’s first encyclical, Deus Caritas Est (God is Love), which was issued on Christmas Day in 2005. This beautiful encyclical captures the essence of the Christian message. God, the Creator and Source of all things is pure love. If we are to be united with God, we must demonstrate and share that love with others. I encourage you to read the entire encyclical here (lengthy but well well worth the effort) but set forth below is an excerpt:

“‘God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him’. These words from the First Letter of John express with remarkable clarity the heart of the Christian faith: the Christian image of God and the resulting image of mankind and its destiny. In the same verse, Saint John also offers a kind of summary of the Christian life: “We have come to know and to believe in the love God has for us”.

We have come to believe in God’s love: in these words the Christian can express the fundamental decision of his life. Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction. Saint John’s Gospel describes that event in these words: “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should … have eternal life” (3:16). In acknowledging the centrality of love, Christian faith has retained the core of Israel’s faith, while at the same time giving it new depth and breadth. The pious Jew prayed daily the words of the Book of Deuteronomy which expressed the heart of his existence: “Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God is one Lord, and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul and with all your might” (6:4-5). Jesus united into a single precept this commandment of love for God and the commandment of love for neighbour found in the Book of Leviticus: “You shall love your neighbour as yourself” (19:18; cf. Mk12:29-31). Since God has first loved us (cf. 1 Jn 4:10), love is now no longer a mere “command”; it is the response to the gift of love with which God draws near to us.

In a world where the name of God is sometimes associated with vengeance or even a duty of hatred and violence, this message is both timely and significant. For this reason, I wish in my first Encyclical to speak of the love which God lavishes upon us and which we in turn must share with others. That, in essence, is what the two main parts of this Letter are about, and they are profoundly interconnected. The first part is more speculative, since I wanted here—at the beginning of my Pontificate—to clarify some essential facts concerning the love which God mysteriously and gratuitously offers to man, together with the intrinsic link between that Love and the reality of human love. The second part is more concrete, since it treats the ecclesial exercise of the commandment of love of neighbour.”

* * *

Love of neighbour, grounded in the love of God, is first and foremost a responsibility for each individual member of the faithful, but it is also a responsibility for the entire ecclesial community at every level: from the local community to the particular Church and to the Church universal in its entirety. As a community, the Church must practise love. Love thus needs to be organized if it is to be an ordered service to the community. The awareness of this responsibility has had a constitutive relevance in the Church from the beginning: “All who believed were together and had all things in common; and they sold their possessions and goods and distributed them to all, as any had need” (Acts 2:44-5). In these words, Saint Luke provides a kind of definition of the Church, whose constitutive elements include fidelity to the “teaching of the Apostles”, “communion” (koinonia), “the breaking of the bread” and “prayer” (cf. Acts 2:42). The element of “communion” (koinonia) is not initially defined, but appears concretely in the verses quoted above: it consists in the fact that believers hold all things in common and that among them, there is no longer any distinction between rich and poor (cf. also Acts 4:32-37). As the Church grew, this radical form of material communion could not in fact be preserved. But its essential core remained: within the community of believers there can never be room for a poverty that denies anyone what is needed for a dignified life.

Read Deus Caritas Est

Other Resources:

Living Space
Creighton Online Ministries
John Predmore Reflection
Fr. Robert Barron Podcast

 

 

About William Ockham

I am a father of two with eclectic interests in theology, philosophy and sports. I chose the pseudonym William Ockham in honor of his contributions to philosophy, specifically Occam's Razor, and its contributions to modern scientific theory. My blog (www.teilhard.com) explores Ignatian Spirituality and the intersection of faith, science and reason through the life and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (pictured above).
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2 Responses to Sunday Reflection, 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time (October 26, 2014): Responding to God’s Love

  1. Excellent post, William. I especially loved your choice of photo.
    Love is severely lacking in our world today. Loving our neighbor is tough, especially when our neighbor is black, Muslim, gay, poor, or some other dis-qualifier. Love demands that we accept the other as an equal.
    Are we capable of such love?

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