Teilhard de Chardin Quote of the Week (January 12, 2015): Shadow of Death

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[Reflections After a Recent World War I Battle]

“That’s probably why I was more vividly aware of the ‘shadow of death’, and the formidable gift that existence presents us with: an inevitable advance towards an inevitable, sentient end, —a situation from which one can emerge only through physical dissolution … I believe I’ve never felt that to be so real . . . And then I understood a little better the agony of our Lord, on Good Friday. And the remedy seemed clearer to me, always the same: to abandon oneself, with faith and love, to the divine future (the becoming) which is ‘ the most real ‘ of all, ‘the most living’,—whose most terrifying aspect is that of being the most renewing (and hence the most creative, the most precious of all). Yet how difficult it is to fling oneself into the future: inevitably our sensibility sees in it only a dizzy void and restless fluidity: to give it solidity, we must have faith, mustn’t we? Let us pray for one another.”

–– Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Making of a Mind; Letters from a Soldier-Priest (p. 230-31)

About William Ockham

I am a father of two with eclectic interests in theology, philosophy and sports. I chose the pseudonym William Ockham in honor of his contributions to philosophy, specifically Occam's Razor, and its contributions to modern scientific theory. My blog (www.teilhard.com) explores Ignatian Spirituality and the intersection of faith, science and reason through the life and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (pictured above).
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One Response to Teilhard de Chardin Quote of the Week (January 12, 2015): Shadow of Death

  1. Lynda says:

    There is always so much in these quotes from Teilhard. I am left feeling that I have been in a sacred space after reflecting on his words. “And then I understood a little better the agony of our Lord, on Good Friday.” How incredible that must have felt and how very painful and yet what a privilege to be able to feel that agony. Teilhard closes this portion of his letters with incredible words that resonate with my soul and I’m so grateful to hear them and to speak them: “Let us pray for one another.”

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