Peter Faber, S.J. to be declared Saint

Blessed Peter Faber

Soon-to-be Saint Peter Faber, S.J.

I had previously written about the life of Peter (Pierre) Faber, S.J., a companion of St. Ignatius of Loyola and the first Jesuit priest. Pope Francis mentioned Fr. Faber as one of his role models for his pontificate. Pope Francis is elevating the status of Fr. Faber within the Church also as Vatican Insider says that Faber will be declared a Saint before Christmas this year.  From Vatican Insider:

“Pierre Faber, a “Reformed” Jesuit priest whom Francis sees as a model figure, is to be proclaimed as saint before Christmas, Stefania Falasca reports in an article for Italian Catholic newspaper Avvenire. The process for his cause in the Congregation for the Causes of Saints is complete and now all that remains is for Francis to issue the Bull of Canonization that will proclaim the first companion of St. Ignatius a saint, extending the cult of the soon-to-be-saint to the Universal Church.

* * *

Faber’s canonization takes on a whole new meaning as the Jesuit is “a model of spirituality and priestly life for the current successor of Peter. At the same time, he is an important reference point for understanding the Pope’s leadership style.” Faber lived on the cusp of an era when the unity of the Church was being threatened. He mostly kept out of doctrinal disputes and steered his apostolate towards a reform of the Church, becoming a pioneer of ecumenism.”

Francis spoke about Faber in his famous interview with Jesuit journal Civiltà Cattolica, revealing some key aspects of the priest as a figure: “[His] dialogue with all, even the most remote and even with his opponents; his simple piety, a certain naïveté perhaps, his being available straightaway, his careful interior discernment, the fact that he was a man capable of great and strong decisions but also capable of being so gentle and loving.”

“The picture of Faber that emerges from the texts is that of a thinker in action, a man who was profoundly attracted by the figure of Christ and was understanding of people. The cause of separated siblings was one he held close to his heart and he was good at discerning spirits. He lived an exemplary priestly life and the unconditional nature of his ministry was reflected in his patience and gentleness. He gave himself without asking others for anything in return. Faber distinguished himself for his “affective magisterium”, in other words, his gift for spiritual communication with people and his ability to put himself in other people’s shoes.”

Attached here is a wonderful document on the life and spirituality of Peter Faber by Severin Leitner that was graciously provided by Claire Bangasser.

About William Ockham

I am a father of two with eclectic interests in theology, philosophy and sports. I chose the pseudonym William Ockham in honor of his contributions to philosophy, specifically Occam's Razor, and its contributions to modern scientific theory. My blog (www.teilhard.com) explores Ignatian Spirituality and the intersection of faith, science and reason through the life and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (pictured above).
This entry was posted in Ignatian Spirituality and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Peter Faber, S.J. to be declared Saint

  1. Lynda says:

    Thank you to you and Claire for providing these resources. I can understand why Pope Francis would respect Peter Faber, SJ so very much as Our Holy Father is also a gentle but firm person capable of making strong decisions as evidenced by “Evangelii Gaudium” (The Joy of the Gospel) released yesterday. It is indeed an interesting time in the Roman Catholic Church.

  2. Brother Burrito says:

    Reblogged this on .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s