Science, the ‘Economist,’ and the Medieval Theologian

Dating God

robert-grosseteste-1-sized The first academic article I ever published was in 2007 about two medieval British theologians, Robert Grosseteste and John Duns Scotus, titled: “ Light and Love: Robert Grosseteste and John Duns Scotus on the How and Why of Creation ” (although the first popular article I ever published happened to be in America a few months earlier!). Scotus is certainly the better known of the two, but Grosseteste was an “intellectual giant,” to borrow the accolade used in a recent Economist blog post.

Grosseteste (d. 1253) was indeed a unique figure: a “scientist” (if we can anachronistically use that term), a theologian, a philosopher, a pastoral minister, a former chancellor of the nascent Oxford University, the first instructor of the Franciscan friars in England, and eventually the Bishop of Lincoln. In old age, he taught himself Greek (something few of his peers could do) so that he could read, and…

View original post 491 more words

About William Ockham

I am a father of two with eclectic interests in theology, philosophy and sports. I chose the pseudonym William Ockham in honor of his contributions to philosophy, specifically Occam's Razor, and its contributions to modern scientific theory. My blog (www.teilhard.com) explores Ignatian Spirituality and the intersection of faith, science and reason through the life and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (pictured above).
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Science, the ‘Economist,’ and the Medieval Theologian

  1. I had a great visit at the blog of the Friends of Merton… Thanks for this re-blog William.
    Blessings…
    ~ Eric

    I am doing my best to bring the science and spirituality together still … and … I am making fine progress… in fact, I am so full right now, I haven’t even got time to post most of what I learned in the past month… it will be back to jobs and so on soon… I worked hard though in the meantime.


    .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s